Past Events

  • Poetry and the Importance of Voice in Diverse Illness Experiences

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    Friday, December 7, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
    • Humanities in Medicine Lecture
    Rafael Campo, MD, physician and poet

    Rafael Campo, MD teaches and practices medicine at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.  Author of eight highly acclaimed books, he is the recipient of many honors and awards, including a Guggenheim fellowship, an honorary Doctor of Literature degree from Amherst College, a National Poetry Series award, and a Lambda Literary Award for his poetry; his third collection of poetry, Diva (Duke University Press, 2000), was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

    See recording of Rafael Campo's talk.

  • Reimagining Research Ethics

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    Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
    • Humanities in Medicine Lecture
    James DuBois, PhD, Director, Center for Bioethics Research, Washington University School of Medicine

    Everyone thinks research ethics is important. But different stakeholders-- compliance officers, researchers, philosophers, funding agencies, trainees, and members of the public—often mean radically different things by ‘research ethics.’ This talk will explore the concept of research ethics with the aim of ensuring that programs effectively meet the needs of diverse stakeholders in research.

    See recording of James DuBois' lecture.

  • Assisting Death in America: A Cultural Account of a New Medical Frontier

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    Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
    • Humanities in Medicine Lecture
    Mara Buchbinder, PhD, UNC Center for Bioethics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

    In this talk, Professor Buchbinder will present findings from the Vermont Study on Aid-in-Dying, which investigated the implementation of Vermont's "Patient Choice and Control at End of Life" Act, enacted in 2013. Drawing on two years of ethnographic research in Vermont, she will focus on the gaps between advocacy narratives and what assisted death looks like once it is put into practice.

    See recording of Mara Buchbinder's lecture.

  • Overture To A Thursday Morning: Grief, Identity & Coming of Age Through Parental Loss

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    Tuesday, March 27, 2018 - 5:15pm
    Kali Quinn, performance artist, violinist and educator

    Please join us for the second of two shows by Kāli Quinn, performance artist, violinist and educator.

    The second show is: OVERTURE TO A THURSDAY MORNING: Grief, Identity & Coming of Age Through Parental Loss
    When rock-star wannnabe Lila inherits all of her mother's things upon her mother’s death, she discovers the astonishing truth about her own birth in an infant home for "unwed" mothers. This performance is a suspenseful and inspiring journey that questions the will to go on and who to take with you.

  • Vamping: Aging, Memory Loss & End-of-Life Ethics

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    Thursday, March 22, 2018 - 5:15pm
    Kali Quinn, performance artist, violinist and educator

    Please join us for two upcoming shows by Kāli Quinn, performance artist, violinist and educator.

    The first show is:
    VAMPING: Aging, Memory Loss, & End-of-Life Ethics
    Thursday, March 22, 2018 at 5:15pm
    Great Hall, Trent Semans Center, Duke Medical Center
    Campus

    Eleanor sits in a nursing care facility longing for her home of sixty-three years. As she moves through medical testing and care for Alzheimer's Disease, she attempts to make sense of fractured memories, reckon with her regret, and somehow begin to face her imminent death.

  • Lecture by Pulitzer Prize Winning Author Paul Starr

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    Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 5:45pm
    • Endowed Lectureships
    Paul Starr, PhD , Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs, Stuart Professor of Communications and Public Affairs, Princeton University

    Since the early 1980s, two great cycles of change have unfolded in health care-each one set off by rising costs and punctuated by national political conflict. The next phase is taking shape now.

    See recording of Paul Starr's lecture.

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